Art Studio: Horses & Ponies: More than 50 projects and techniques for drawing and painting horses and ponies in pencil, acrylic, watercolor, and more!


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Art Studio: Horses & Ponies makes the art of drawing and painting this evergreen art subject accessible and easy for everyone.

Including more than 50 step-by-step projects of a wide range of horses and ponies, beginning artists will learn the basics of working with graphite and colored pencil; acrylic, oil, and watercolor; pastel; and pen and ink.

By experimenting with these different tools and techniques, artists will build their artistic skill level, discover their own unique style, and gain confidence in the process. Filled with a combination of traditional and contemporary art styles, there is something for every aspiring fine artist desiring to master the craft. Tips for rendering details, an introduction to tools and materials, and an overview of techniques for each featured medium round out this helpful reference.

The Art Studio series is designed to give an overview of each art medium to help beginning artists delve into fine art and determine which media they best enjoy working with.


From the Publisher

HORSE DETAILS

MUZZLE

MUZZLE

EYE Horses’ eyes have a lot of detail,

EYE Horses’ eyes have a lot of detail,

EARS Render the horse’s forelock hair with long, slightly curving strokes. Then shade the interior

EARS Render the horse’s forelock hair with long, slightly curving strokes. Then shade the interior

MUZZLE

The muzzle has subtle, curved forms, which are defined with careful shading. The area around the nostril is raised, as is the area just above the mouth; indicate this shape by pulling out highlights with a kneaded eraser.

EYE

Horses’ eyes have a lot of detail, from the creases around the eyes to the straight, thick eyelashes. To create a sense of life in the eye, leave a light crescent-shaped area to show reflected light, and leave a stark white highlight above it.

EARS

Render the horse’s forelock hair with long, slightly curving strokes. Then shade the interior of the ear with upward, parallel strokes, making them darkest at the bottom and gradually lighter as you move up the ear.

An ancient breed with Spanish influence, the Friesian is an elegant, large-boned horse originating from the Friesland region of the Netherlands.

Using an HB pencil, begin by establishing the basic outline of the horse

Using an HB pencil, begin by establishing the basic outline of the horse

With the same pencil, further define the shape of the horse. Start building on the lines

With the same pencil, further define the shape of the horse. Start building on the lines

Continue to refine the outline you established in step 2.

Continue to refine the outline you established in step 2.

1

Using an HB pencil, begin by establishing the basic outline of the horse. Note the curvature of the neck, which will be hidden under the mane in the final steps. Keep your lines loose and sketchy, and focus on how the lines and shapes relate to one another. It helps to view the mane as a cohesive shape rather than individual hairs. You may also indicate individual features such as the eye, nostrils, ears, and muscles.

2

With the same pencil, further define the shape of the horse. Start building on the lines from the initial sketch, establishing accurate curves for the ears, muzzle, eye, and muscle structure of the neck. Continue using light, overlapping strokes to establish the direction of hair on the mane.

3

Continue to refine the outline you established in step 2.

The Friesian is a popular performance horse known for its proud carriage, arched neck, and high-stepping action.

With a 3B pencil, begin developing the darkest parts with layers of graphite, making them darker

With a 3B pencil, begin developing the darkest parts with layers of graphite, making them darker

layers graphite, firmly the light and dark areas of the horse create deepest shades black

layers graphite, firmly the light and dark areas of the horse create deepest shades black

them. Apply firm, overlapping strokes in the shadows of the mane strokes stick eraser lighter

them. Apply firm, overlapping strokes in the shadows of the mane strokes stick eraser lighter

4

With a 3B pencil, begin developing the darkest parts with layers of graphite, making them darker with successive layers. For the mane, use a sharp pencil and loose strokes to layer lines in the direction of hair growth. The graphite blends as you add layers. If an area gets too dark, lift out some of the graphite with a kneaded eraser. Then use a tortillon to soften edges and move tone into the highlights.

5

Further develop layers of graphite, firmly establishing the light and dark areas of the horse. Use a 6B and a 9B to create the deepest shades of black. At this point, the form is clearly developing and the muscles appear rounded. The smooth coat should start to appear shiny in the highlighted areas. Even though the Friesian is a black horse, it is important to include light areas that define and shape the surface of the animal, giving the illusion of depth and form.

6

With a 6B, add layers of graphite over the shadowed areas, blending and darkening them. Apply firm, overlapping strokes in the shadows of the mane and lighter strokes in the lightest areas. Using a stick eraser, define the lighter hair that overlaps the dark areas of the mane, keeping the strokes soft by blending them with a tortillon and lifting out light areas with a kneaded eraser. Use the side of your pencil to cover larger areas with graphite, blending with a tortillon as you go. Finally, take time to study the eye and nostrils, paying close attention to how the light and dark areas make these areas appear realistic.

Publisher‏:‎Walter Foster Publishing (March 19, 2019)
Language‏:‎English
Paperback‏:‎144 pages
ISBN-10‏:‎1633226956
ISBN-13‏:‎978-1633226951
Item Weight‏:‎1.45 pounds
Dimensions‏:‎8.75 x 0.55 x 11.65 inches

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